Thursday, July 27, 2006

Ranting on Dr. A's Blog

I've been visiting Dr. A's blog and ranting there about the case where the courts have taken partial custody of a child when his parents have supported his decision not to continue with chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. Anyone want to rant with me?

[posted by dinah]

7 comments:

Shiny Happy Person said...

Not really, but I will agree with you. The lazy option.

Sarebear said...

There was a case in Utah about 3? years ago? of Parker Jensen . . . they actually were going to completely take him away from his parents, and file criminal charges against the parents for not making him do the medical treatment that the doctors got the court to order (heaven forbid a parent disagree w/a doctor).

It was a big mess, they went into hiding and stuff.

I am really worried about the state stepping into the parental decisions that are made too much.

NeoNurseChic said...

I've ranted away there 3 times on that case already... But yet, we're still in the minority with our view...

Dinah said...

Amazing..... though I have to say, my strong feelings about this could easily sway if there were real information about the case-- like his stage & prognosis and the likely effects of therapy. Apparently, the teenager had a 3 month course of chemo (initially it sounded like a single treatment, not a full course) and his cancer did not respond. I'm not much for government intrusion in individual affairs, but, as I've said over at Dr. A's, I'm not in favor of letting teens commit suicide either.

NeoNurseChic said...
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On the Same Page said...

By analogy, in CA, if you have a sexual relationship with someone 16 years of age, you are guilty of statutory rape. Why? Because they have not reached the age of consent. You cannot vote, you cannot purchase or consume alcohol or tobacco, or operate a motor vehicle at night at age 16. Why, then, may we presume that any 16 year old, despite perceived "maturity," is competent to provide consent for life-saving medical care?

One group of researchers emphsized the need to consider unique issues that arise in the care of persons who derive from special populations or have sources of vulnerability in clinical care contexts, with specific attention to adolescents.

Even when you read Barron Lerner, MD in the NY Times, that the patient has a right to say "no," it seems obvious that age is a significant issue, and there is no comparison and no logic or bioethic that should support such a decision.

NeoNurseChic said...
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